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Posted by on Aug 15, 2016 | 0 comments

Are Women Human?

Are Women Human?

In 1938, Dorothy Sayers addressed a society of women on the issue of feminism. This address came twenty years after the Representation of the People Act of 1918 which granted voting rights to a limited number of women over 30 years old and ten years after the Representation of the People Act 1928 which granted the same voting rights to women as men. Sayers, a public intellectual and writer, was well versed in the Suffrage Movement and the inequality in all levels of society for women. Those in the audience may have expected an amiable lecture on the merits of feminism in light of the recent successes and continued struggles for the feminist cause. Those expectations, though, would have been shattered as Sayers begins her address: When I was asked to come and speak to you, your Secretary made the suggestion that she thought I must be interested in the feminist movement. I replied—a little irritably, I am afraid—that I was not sure I wanted to ‘identify myself,’ as the...

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Posted by on Sep 25, 2014 | 2 comments

White Privilege: From Defensiveness to Loving Action

White Privilege: From Defensiveness to Loving Action

This is a guest post by Kathy, friend of Many Horizons. Her own blog can be found here. Conversations around privilege—from racial to gender to socioeconomic and on—can be quite off-putting. They can be shaming. They can be offensive. They can be angry and filled with emotion. To be sure, I am no scholar on any of the countless topics around diversity and inequality on which many books have been written. All I can offer is my personal analysis based on my studies as an engineering and theology student—and my experiences as a gender, sexual, and ethnic minority[1], and daughter to immigrant parents. A few assumptions I’m bringing to the table: We daily contend with systems of injustice based upon societal and institutionalized biases. There are entire demographics of people who not only see injustice, but are in fact victims of injustice based on their race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. Some of those in privileged demographics—to varying levels—recognize the degree of their privilege, and others very much do not....

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Posted by on Jul 28, 2014 | 10 comments

A Response to “Women Against Feminism”

A Response to “Women Against Feminism”

Note: This article is being re-shared in light of Peter Leithart’s recent claim that “Feminism is gender Arianism” in his April 8, 2015 First Things article. I find Leithart’s claim suffering from the same error as the WAF approach: claiming a universal and singularly identifiable “feminism.” A couple weeks ago, the Tumblr blog Women Against Feminism (WAF) showed up via Buzzfeed on my Facebook timeline. I clicked the link to find myself scrolling through images of women holding up signs stating various reasons why they are not feminists. These reasons can be grouped in a number of categories, most notably: I am not a feminist because… I like men and the attention I receive from them. I am not a victim and do not like to live in the fear that I am one. my present situation is already one of equality. I do not like being belittled for being a housewife/stay-at-home-mom. I do not need (angry, bitter, man-hating) women to speak for me. I hold to traditional family values. Despite...

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Posted by on Jan 20, 2014 | 7 comments

Calling Men to Speak

Calling Men to Speak

I recall sitting at the bar with a group of male seminary students about a year ago, discussing the usual topics: polity, politics, and philosophy. The conversation eventually wound down to chitchat amongst different sections at the table. One of the men, a year out from being a pastor of his own congregation, commented on the figure of a women a few tables over. All of the seminarians followed suit, making their own comments about the woman. This went on for some time, long enough to forget our recent discussion about holiness, the sacraments, and sanctification. Here was a group of young men, theologians and soon-to-be-pastors, nonchalantly discussing their sexual preferences with an unknown young woman as their muse. I didn’t play ball that day. Instead, I stayed silent. I drank my beer, and I eventually left. But silence is part of the problem, and men have to start speaking up. Bypassing the conversation on different movements of feminism, radical or moderate, it’s time men start looking in the mirror to...

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