Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Jun 16, 2016 | 3 comments

The Nicene Creed: “We believe in one God…”

The Nicene Creed: “We believe in one God…”

**This post is part of a series reflecting on the Nicene Creed** << Previous post View series Next post >>   We believe in one God, the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible. The catalyst for the Nicene Creed, as Alex detailed in his introductory post, was the question: WHO IS THE SON OF GOD? To enter into this historical discussion is to wade into a truly complicated and often descriptively oversimplified discussion of the Christological debate in the early Church.[1] The central question revolved around the issue of the divinity and humanity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God—was the Son a divine soul embedded within a human body? a moral exemplar, the best of what it is to be human but not divine? a divine person who only appeared to be human, but was not? To begin the creed with the affirmation of one God, Father, and Creator, might appear at first glance to be concerned with something other...

Read More

Posted by on Jul 23, 2015 | 5 comments

Christian Theology Needs Good Stories

Christian Theology Needs Good Stories

  I am at the very beginning stages of a long journey in dissertation writing. In my usual meandering and often frustrating mode, I am beginning this journey with an intuitive kernel and then working towards a substantial and convincing argument. My intuitive kernel is this: stories do something important for theology. No, more than that: Christian theology in some way needs good stories. The grounding for this is pretty easy to point to: Christians are storied people. Our Hebraic roots are in stories of God calling forth order from chaos, a guy from Ur to establish a nation in a land flowing with milk and honey, stories of identity formation and personal failings, stories of a people struggling to do right and stories of a frustrated and long-suffering God. The climax of this storied history comes via four story-tellers, the four Gospel accounts proclaiming God become incarnate and the tearing of the veil between heaven and earth. Of course, these stories contain and give rise to important dogmatic...

Read More

Posted by on Jun 19, 2015 | 0 comments

Hildegard of Bingen: Theology Spoken, Seen, and Heard

Hildegard of Bingen: Theology Spoken, Seen, and Heard

    Hildegard of Bingen (1098–1179) was born as the tenth child of an honorable family in a town to the northwest of Worms. She was handed over to the church at the age of ten to the hermitess Jutta, who taught Hildegard to read Latin, chant the Office and live out the Benedictine Rule. Throughout her life Hildegard experienced mystical visions alongside severe bouts of illness, but it was not until her later life that she experienced her prophetic call. In 1141, at the age of 43, she received a vision where she is called by a voice from heaven to share what she sees and hears in her subsequent visions. This call is recorded at the start of Scivias along with the infamous image of Hildegard sitting to write with pentecostal flames dancing on her head: “‘O human, speak these things that you see and hear. And write them not by yourself or any other human being, but by the will of Him Who knows, sees and...

Read More