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Posted by on Sep 12, 2016 | 0 comments

How to be Thankful

How to be Thankful

I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people.- 1 Tim 2:1 In my previous post I wrote about the life of thankfulness that comes from intentionally partaking of the Eucharist with a spirit of thanksgiving. I shared how my fear of God’s judgment limited my experience of joy when I received the bread and the wine. In this post I will ask how does a life of thankfulness inspired by the sacrament help us destroy the envy that seeks to rule our lives. To do this I am going to turn to St. John Chrysostom: a fourth century father of the church who is celebrated this week in Catholic and Anglican churches. John Chrysostom was born in Antioch in 349. He was classically trained in rhetoric and Greek. When he turned 26 he left Antioch to become a hermit. His severe asceticism had detrimental effects on his health. He returned to Antioch where he preached his famous homilies—most of which we have till this day....

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Posted by on Aug 12, 2016 | 0 comments

The Feast of Thanksgiving

The Feast of Thanksgiving

And be thankful. Col. 3:15b Growing up I didn’t really know what communion meant. When I was a kid I was taught that the proper way to take communion in my church was to hold the cup and wafer with stillness and solemnity while confessing my sins. Then, following the words of the preacher, I would eat the wafer and drink the cup in unison with the whole of the congregation. Communion was a time to remember that Jesus died for us to take away our sins, and proper etiquette was required for that moment once a month when we passed along the trays full of grape juice.This was really hard for a kid who didn’t know how to stop wiggling.  In high school I was instructed that to not properly confess my sins before taking communion was risking calling God’s wrath down upon me, for this is the obvious and clear meaning of 1 Cor. 11:29-30. It has taken me a long time to break away from this habit of internal...

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Posted by on Jul 7, 2016 | 4 comments

The Nicene Creed: “And [we believe] in the Holy Ghost…”

The Nicene Creed: “And [we believe] in the Holy Ghost…”

With the annunciation of the Holy Spirit the Nicene Creed completes its Trinitarian formulation. But to understand the role of the Spirit in the Trinity we have to look back into the Creed. In doing so it will be come clear that the Holy Spirit isn’t a new phenomenon but an eternal participant with the Father and the Son in the creation, maintenance, and healing of the world.

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Posted by on Jun 13, 2016 | 0 comments

The Nicene Creed: A Brief Introduction

The Nicene Creed: A Brief Introduction

Written in 325 CE, and amended in 381, the Nicene Creed has been the standard of orthodoxy since its origin. Outside of the Bible, it is the single most important text of the Christian faith. Unlike the Apostle’s Creed, which is a statement of an individual’s faith traditionally recited at their baptism, the Nicene Creed is a communal affirmation, and as such it is a proclamation of worship that unites the Church under one doctrine.

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Posted by on May 31, 2016 | 0 comments

George Herbert, the Church, and the Self

George Herbert, the Church, and the Self

  George Herbert was a Welsh poet and priest born in 1593 to landed aristocracy. His mother, Magdalene Herbert, was the Gertrude Stein of the 17th century English literary scene; Herbert grew up associating with the best and the ablest writers of his age. He could count as friends John Donne, Lancelot Andrews, and Francis Bacon. His brother Sir Edward is known as the father of English deists, whose book de Veritate sought to prove that true religion was composed of five “common notions,” as any more would be excessive.[1] Edward was a hot-blooded monarchist who once fought off six assassins with a broken sword.[2] George Herbert was the opposite of Edward. He was one of the brightest Latin minds of his generation. He was elected orator at Cambridge. He gave speeches in Latin before King James and Prince Charles. He taught rhetoric. By all accounts George Herbert should have become Secretary of State. So, how he ended up becoming a priest in an inconsequential town 75 miles west of...

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