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Posted by on Oct 10, 2016 | 0 comments

Planting: a millennial’s guide to motherhood.

Planting: a millennial’s guide to motherhood.

I’m a millennial to my core. I fall in the correct age range. I took a year off after college to accumulate “experiences.” I completed a degree in theology which, as my grandmother keeps reminding me, will never come to any practical use or gainful employment. Like every 18-35 year old with their parents’ Netflix password, I binge-watched Stranger Things. (It was rad.) Vocationally unmoored, prone to frequent brunches, convinced I have a unique creative talent of which the wider world should not be deprived, I’ve fit the criteria a little too closely until now. But now, all of a sudden, my life is merged with a tiny dependent I’ve never met but am bound to in every way. The first month I stopped taking my birth control, every day was an adventure. I bought a 25-pack of cheap pregnancy tests on Amazon prime and took one nearly every morning. I came to expect it. The one dark red line, clear as a stop sign on the road. Not...

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Posted by on Jul 14, 2016 | 4 comments

The Nicene Creed: “One Church”

The Nicene Creed: “One Church”

**This post is part of a series reflecting on the Nicene Creed** << Previous post View series Next post >>     “And we believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.” “Pope Says Having A Personal Relationship With Jesus Is Dangerous” ran the headline. Of course, the Pope had said nothing of the sort. He had only called dangerous the temptation to think that you can “go it alone” in your faith, without the support of others, a statement with which most Protestants would heartily agree.[1] But the accusation points to a crucial question with which the Pope and his accusers probably nonetheless differ: Is Christian faith communal by its very nature, or only by accident? Can someone be authentically Christian, a true disciple of Christ, if they have nothing to do with the Church? At first sight the answer would seem that faith can be individual. Believing in Jesus and following his teaching matters more than going to church services. Aren’t there millions of hypocrites who attend church but...

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Posted by on Apr 25, 2015 | 0 comments

The Body at Work

The Body at Work

A pounding headache during the Easter Vigil, brought on by dehydration. Coming in late at night, cold and wet from a day out in rain and hail. A splatter of dog feces in the face. All of these things are realities of my new job. In the last month I’ve been mowing lawns for a company in Vancouver in order to pay for life in the post-school world. There are also other realities though: a sense of satisfaction, an enjoyment of the outdoors, and a new awareness of my body. One could hardly imagine a job more different from the work I did in school, but I’m glad I’m doing it. It’s the latter point about body awareness that I want to focus on in today’s post, however. It’s fairly well understood that academics aren’t always the best with our bodies. Afterall, our job involves sitting in libraries or behind desks all day, and so unless we consciously build in a routine of exercise or sports it’s very easy...

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Posted by on Sep 29, 2014 | 6 comments

Smartphones are turning us into animals (Or, why Gregory of Nyssa might say your iPhone is below your human dignity)

Smartphones are turning us into animals (Or, why Gregory of Nyssa might say your iPhone is below your human dignity)

The other day as I attempted to make my way across campus as quickly as possible to avoid sweating out my entire body weight, I again and again found myself running into undergrads, fancy new iPhone 6 in-hand, who were entirely oblivious to their surroundings. The capable and intelligent next generation could not do the simplest of tasks (putting one foot in front of the other at a somewhat consistent pace and direction) because they were hunchbacked and curled over their phones. Upon arriving at my destination, I walked into the building only to find throngs of students once again hunched over their phones, this time sitting or leaning, waiting for the classroom to empty so they can pile in. Once arriving in this classroom, they will then likely find their seat, nod to a friend and check to see what they might have missed on Facebook or Instagram during their transition time. In On the Making of Man, Gregory of Nyssa explores the theological significance of creation of the...

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Posted by on Sep 4, 2014 | 1 comment

Facing Apathy: Spiritual Practices and Cultivating Desire for God

Facing Apathy: Spiritual Practices and Cultivating Desire for God

I am TA-ing for a course this fall on the Inklings with Dr. Ralph Wood. Earlier this week, while discussing G.K. Chesterton’s The Ball and the Cross, Wood said that the world desires to “pave over with concrete” the deep longing for God. Now what here is designated as “world” can be disputed, but what I want to argue cannot be disputed is that one of the greatest temptations of the Christian, particularly the intellectual Christian is to be paved over with concrete—to be apathetic in the Christian life. This particular kind of apathy is most often seen by people like me. People who spend much of their time reading the great works of Christianity—Scripture, Church Fathers and Mothers, the mystics over the ages—or preaching and teaching from these great works. It is a particular sort of habit, dare I say sin, that continues to follow me year after year. My friend Michael Yankoski just finished and will soon release a book where he recounts his own year where...

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