Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Jan 9, 2014 | 0 comments

Salvation is not the point.  The point is what we do with Salvation.

Salvation is not the point. The point is what we do with Salvation.

At this moment a 450 ton, 385 foot long, monstrosity of mining equipment is parked in southern Idaho. This so-called “mega-load” is headed for the tar sands oil operations of Northern Alberta and thus has another 1300 miles to travel before it is used in the most energy and water demanding mining process in the already-black history of oil drilling. A profoundly well argued critical analysis of the dangers and costs associated with the mega-loads can be found in David James Duncan and Rick Bass’ The Heart of the Monster. Sitting here in Idaho, the local papers document, rather, the crawling 60 mile-per-day progress of the load: mostly to inform us about the impending traffic closures. The Christian community has responded in its typical fashion—with silence: silent about the tar sands, silent about our backyard mega-load corridor, silent about clear-cutting, dam building, and fracking—silent. Christian political discourse in this county has become so warped that you would think God cared more about stopping gay folks from having sex than...

Read More

Posted by on Oct 31, 2013 | 0 comments

Kathleen Norris and Creaturely Play

Kathleen Norris and Creaturely Play

  I am very excited. Tomorrow night one of my favorite writers comes to the humble city of Waco, Texas and I get the privilege of hearing her speak. Her influence is seen in my life in many ways: in my joy at the smell of yeast as bread rises on my kitchen counter at this precise moment, in my delight at the sound of the trees outside my window rustling in the gusty Texas wind, in the enjoyable bitter note left on my tongue after my last sip of coffee. Kathleen Norris has helped me to play in the common-place activities of a creaturely life. Her writing came into my life when the mundane  was weighing me down. When the walk from the bus to my house day-after-day with cold, wet feet from yet another Vancouver rainfall reminded me of my disdain for monotony. When working to pay bills,  attempting to keep up in reading and  re-memorizing the same Hebrew vocab to receive that prized “A” consumed my...

Read More

Posted by on Oct 21, 2013 | 2 comments

Wine, Place, and Pilgrimage

Wine, Place, and Pilgrimage

I spent the last three weeks of September in Northern Spain, walking sections of the Camino de Santiago and drinking Spanish wine. Spain, like France, has instituted a form of appellation controlée. This means that in order to put Rioja on a bottle, for example, the wine must come from the Rioja region. The philosophy behind the appellation controlée is the concept of terroir: the idea that places give unique characteristics to wine. Roger Scruton, in his book “I Drink therefore I am” explains: From the moment of my fall, I was a terroiriste, for whom the principal ingredient in any bottle is the soil.  By ‘soil’ I do not mean only the physical mix of limestone, topsoil, and humus.  I mean the soil as Jean Giono, Giovanni Verga, or D.H. Lawrence would describe it: nurse of passions, stage of dramas, and habitat of local gods… There in the glass was the soil of a place, and in that soil was a soul.” (12,13) Soil, as I have come...

Read More

Posted by on Jun 27, 2013 | 1 comment

The Idol of Technology and the Fear of Bears

The Idol of Technology and the Fear of Bears

In the last ten years there has been an average of just under 3 fatalities by bear mauling per year in North America. The last death by the paws of a grizzly in Northwest Montana was in 1998. There are around 2 million visitors a year to Glacier National Park. Of the roughly 30 million visitors to Glacier in the last 15 years, how many do you reckon were frightened of bears? Statistics surely don’t tell you everything- or even very much- but these statistics illustrate our propensity to fear despite reality. How much more so would we fear what truly costs us? There is a hotel 12 miles inside the park boundary of Glacier National Park. Situated at the top end of a mountain valley, the Many Glacier Hotel marks the trailhead for several of the best hikes in the park. Consequently, when I worked there as a concierge, we received a great deal of foot traffic from backpackers, day hikers, and others, in addition to regular hotel...

Read More