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Posted by on Oct 10, 2016 | 0 comments

Planting: a millennial’s guide to motherhood.

Planting: a millennial’s guide to motherhood.

I’m a millennial to my core. I fall in the correct age range. I took a year off after college to accumulate “experiences.” I completed a degree in theology which, as my grandmother keeps reminding me, will never come to any practical use or gainful employment. Like every 18-35 year old with their parents’ Netflix password, I binge-watched Stranger Things. (It was rad.) Vocationally unmoored, prone to frequent brunches, convinced I have a unique creative talent of which the wider world should not be deprived, I’ve fit the criteria a little too closely until now. But now, all of a sudden, my life is merged with a tiny dependent I’ve never met but am bound to in every way. The first month I stopped taking my birth control, every day was an adventure. I bought a 25-pack of cheap pregnancy tests on Amazon prime and took one nearly every morning. I came to expect it. The one dark red line, clear as a stop sign on the road. Not...

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Posted by on Aug 15, 2016 | 0 comments

Are Women Human?

Are Women Human?

In 1938, Dorothy Sayers addressed a society of women on the issue of feminism. This address came twenty years after the Representation of the People Act of 1918 which granted voting rights to a limited number of women over 30 years old and ten years after the Representation of the People Act 1928 which granted the same voting rights to women as men. Sayers, a public intellectual and writer, was well versed in the Suffrage Movement and the inequality in all levels of society for women. Those in the audience may have expected an amiable lecture on the merits of feminism in light of the recent successes and continued struggles for the feminist cause. Those expectations, though, would have been shattered as Sayers begins her address: When I was asked to come and speak to you, your Secretary made the suggestion that she thought I must be interested in the feminist movement. I replied—a little irritably, I am afraid—that I was not sure I wanted to ‘identify myself,’ as the...

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Posted by on Jun 22, 2015 | 7 comments

What is Worship?

What is Worship?

  I grew up in a church which was home to two competing attitudes to Christian worship. One of them was expressed when people emerged from a service grumbling that they “didn’t get anything out of” the worship that morning. The other was manifest in a common response to this complaint: “It doesn’t matter whether you got anything out of it. Worship isn’t for your benefit, but for God’s.” These contrasting views made either: (1) pleasing human beings, or (2) pleasing God, to be the primary purpose of worship. In recent years I’ve been led to question both these perspectives.[1] Not because it’s wrong to enjoy worship or to see God as enjoying it, but because both these angles miss something essential about what worship is for, why we were given this gift and discipline as followers of Jesus. In what follows I’m going to say three things worship is not, to clear the ground for a final statement on what I think worship is. Worship is not especially...

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Posted by on Apr 25, 2015 | 0 comments

The Body at Work

The Body at Work

A pounding headache during the Easter Vigil, brought on by dehydration. Coming in late at night, cold and wet from a day out in rain and hail. A splatter of dog feces in the face. All of these things are realities of my new job. In the last month I’ve been mowing lawns for a company in Vancouver in order to pay for life in the post-school world. There are also other realities though: a sense of satisfaction, an enjoyment of the outdoors, and a new awareness of my body. One could hardly imagine a job more different from the work I did in school, but I’m glad I’m doing it. It’s the latter point about body awareness that I want to focus on in today’s post, however. It’s fairly well understood that academics aren’t always the best with our bodies. Afterall, our job involves sitting in libraries or behind desks all day, and so unless we consciously build in a routine of exercise or sports it’s very easy...

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Posted by on Oct 30, 2014 | 1 comment

The Difficulty of Reading

The Difficulty of Reading

Amidst switching between three different reading communities (undergraduate and two different graduate school settings), I have been faced with a certain kind of difficulty of reading texts. Likely, what I want to articulate in this post is self-evident to many, but for me it is only in this third reading community that the true issue-at-hand has presented itself. The difficulty of reading is that reading is always done within communities. Like our title Many Horizons, there are many horizons for reading texts and these readings are dictated both by the communities in which we have read and presently read. Within these communities there are subdivisions where different ways of reading—i.e. lenses for reading, a hermeneutic—are present. These lenses are defined by overarching theological and philosophical frameworks, be they overtly or subversively presented. So, for instance, reading texts in my undergraduate setting was done through the overarching framework that the way God speaks is through his Word and the way for that Word to speak presently to us today is...

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